Traditional Baguette

Traditional Baguette

Crispy on the outside and soft inside, while in France, all foreigners fall in love with it. For the French it is still the bakery’s diva that no one resists.

We know of two different versions about the baguette ́s origin. The first one says that the bread appeared under the Napoleonic regime; the bread was round for better preservation; it is said that the recent form had been invented by Napoleon’s bakers as the easiest way to transport it by the soldiers who carried them in their pants. We still have doubts about the baguette ́s condition after a day of walking!

Another theory suggests that the baguette’s form knows its origin in Vienna. The Viennese bread was imported into France in the nineteenth century and then developed in the 1920s in Paris. A law prohibiting the bakers work before 4am encouraged the development of the baguette because its preparation required less time kneading and baking than the round bread.

The bread is a symbol of France and, perhaps more than ever, bakers are looking for excellent quality in the bread they make and for the greatest delight of the French.

Easy recipe:

For 2 Baguettes

300 g of water

2tbsp of salt

1 tea spoon of sugar

490 g of flour

1 packet of yeast of “Boulanger Briochin”

A bread machine to make the dough and knead

Place all ingredients in the bread machine; once the dough is kneaded, shape the dough on the table; take the form of a baguette, and then put a damp cloth on it.

Bake at 200°c for 20 minutes or until the pastry is golden Brown.

Bonne dégustation!

baguette

baguette, photos from Pinterest

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